balancing quality vs. quantity content
Sara Sargent
By:

In the Content War of Quality and Quantity: Who Wins?

Content marketing campaigns can pose a content dichotomy of quality content versus large quantities.

Do you generate quality content on a slower schedule, or do you produce lots of content that may have less value for your audience?

And even if you want to marry quantity and quality, how much content is too much content to put out a high-quality product?

Actionable Is the New Quality

Many strong content marketing campaign puts great stock in quality work. So what’s considered “quality?” For starters, quality pieces tend to utilize SEO elements, blending a mix of informative content and high visibility for greater success.

While SEO is a valuable resource, true high-quality content asserts your business’s authority in a particular field, while also growing your audience.

In other words, quality content has an actionable value. When audiences can identify with the emotions behind a piece, or can take away advice on how to use a product, they’re more likely to develop a sense of empathy for your company.

It’s an undeniable fact, though, that crafting quality work takes time.

Working with Quantity

Many content marketing campaigns champion quantity. A quantity of content simply describes the practice of putting out a significant amount of short-form pieces over the course of a single day, week, or appropriate period.

Jeff Bezos has campaigned to create 1,200 posts to be released on the Washington Post’s platform per day to grow its traffic. Over the past year, the Post has seen the benefit of this mass-quantity marketing campaign. Site traffic has increased by 28 percent, which is huge for an old-world journalistic publication.

That quantity, however, means that pieces can sometimes consist of 100-word posts that lack inherent and well-researched value.

A thousand pieces of content shared per day may bring in new eyes, new traffic and new possibilities. It can also prevent your consumer from finding value in any of it.

Disputing the Debate

With all that in mind—quality and quantity both have their place in a successful content marketing campaign.

In fact, it’s more effective to diversify the content you share with your audience. Well crafted, long-form work can offer your audience high-quality content to return to over and over again. Short-form content can catch that audience’s eye, especially when distributed effectively.

Distribution actually weighs as much into the impact of your work as its quality or quantity. Do you have a significant amount of useful content? Get it out as quickly as possible, in short blog posts or videos. If you have slower, more in-depth content, dig in for those long-form articles or e-books. The tortoise and the hare were friends in the end, after all.

Putting It into Practice

Consider your business’ development goals and your own distribution schedule. How much content it too much?

When you blend quality and quantity, you’ll prevent your campaign from stretching too thin while still actively reaching new consumers.

Image attribution: DOC RABE Media – stock.adobe.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

[gravityform id="3" title="false" description="false" ajax="true"]
[gravityform id="3" title="false" description="false"]